Foods Not To Give To Your Dog

While it is tempting to share your food with your fury family member, you should be aware that many of the human foods are poisonous for dogs. You should avoid ordering foods for your dog from the below menu.

APPETIZERS

Baby Food – Many people try to give baby foods especially to pups when they are not feeling well. Baby foods are not bad in general. However, you should make sure the baby food you are giving does not contain any onion powder. Also, baby foods do not contain all the necessary nutrients for a healthy dog.

Chewing Gum – Most chewing gum contains a sugar called Xylitol which has no effects on humans. However, it can cause a surge of insulin in dogs that drops a dog’s blood sugar to dangerous level. If your dog eats large amount of gums, it can damage liver, kidney or worse.

Candy – Many of the candies also contain Xylitol, the same type of sugar as Chewing gum. So, keep candies and chewing gums away from the reach of your dogs and puppies.


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Chocolate – Chocolates are considered poisonous for dogs. Chocolates contain caffeine and theobromine which can be toxic for your dog. Chocolates can cause panting, vomiting, and diarrhea, and damage your dog’s heart and nervous systems.

Corn on the cob – Dogs can eat Corn, but not the cob. Most dogs cannot digest cob easily, which can cause intestinal obstruction, a very serious and possibly fatal medical condition if not treated immediately.

Macadamia Nuts – Macadamia nuts also known as Australia Nuts can cause weakness, depression, vomiting, tremors and hyperthermia in dogs.

Mushrooms – Mushrooms are tricky. While some types of Mushrooms are fine, others can be toxic for dogs. Some types of mushrooms can cause serious stomach issues for dogs. As a cautious dog owner, you should try to avoid giving mushrooms to your dog.

Tobacco – Never give tobacco to your dog. The effects of nicotine on dogs are much more worse than humans. The toxic level of nicotine in dogs is 5 milligrams of nicotine per pound of body weight. In dogs, 10 mg/kg is potentially lethal.


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